Error loading page.
Try refreshing the page. If that doesn't work, there may be a network issue, and you can use our self test page to see what's preventing the page from loading.
Learn more about possible network issues or contact support for more help.

William Blake

Audiobook

"To see a World in a Grain of Sand
And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
And Eternity in an hour." —from "Auguries of Innocence"

At the end of his life, William Blake gave up hope of being widely understood, but the twentieth century brought his work a new and intense interest and acclaim. A poet, artist, and mystic, Blake declared that "I must Create a System or be enslav'd by another Man's." And create he did.

Included in this collection are well-known poems such as "Tyger! Tyger! burning bright" and "A Poison Tree," longer poems such as "The Everlasting Gospel," an assortment of epigrams and short satire, and Blake's principal prose work, "The Marriage of Heaven and Hell."


Expand title description text
Publisher: Blackstone Publishing Edition: Unabridged

OverDrive Listen audiobook

  • ISBN: 9781481537544
  • File size: 57348 KB
  • Release date: March 8, 2005
  • Duration: 01:59:28

MP3 audiobook

  • ISBN: 9781481537544
  • File size: 57491 KB
  • Release date: March 8, 2005
  • Duration: 01:59:28
  • Number of parts: 3

Loading
Loading

Formats

OverDrive Listen audiobook
MP3 audiobook

subjects

Fiction Poetry

Languages

English

"To see a World in a Grain of Sand
And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
And Eternity in an hour." —from "Auguries of Innocence"

At the end of his life, William Blake gave up hope of being widely understood, but the twentieth century brought his work a new and intense interest and acclaim. A poet, artist, and mystic, Blake declared that "I must Create a System or be enslav'd by another Man's." And create he did.

Included in this collection are well-known poems such as "Tyger! Tyger! burning bright" and "A Poison Tree," longer poems such as "The Everlasting Gospel," an assortment of epigrams and short satire, and Blake's principal prose work, "The Marriage of Heaven and Hell."


Expand title description text